Tag Archives: Google

Benefits of Google

I had a conversation with someone earlier today (2017-05-03), and she mentioned that she never used Google. She mentioned that she used Yahoo. First thing that came to mind is that we must be back in 1999. Now, I used to used Yahoo until they became incompetent, and there are still those few people that will swear by it. I however feel it might be worth mentioning the real world benefits of Google.

Now, I am not a fanboy, and I do understand that Google is first and foremost an advertising company. They provide “free” services to generate anonymized user data to rent to companies. But in turn so does Yahoo, and Bing. Google is just more successful. Continue reading Benefits of Google

First Impression – HP Envy 4500 MFC

HP is known for making computers, but they also manufacture printers. The HP Envy 4500 All in One Series printer is one of those. I referred to it as an MFC in the title because MFC is typically recognized as Multi-Function Center. The printer is 15lbs (package weight). It supports Wifi-N (rather than AC), and has a USB port which it also came with a cable. The MFC can handle copy, print, and scanning. Being an inkjet printer, it can also support photo printing. The printer uses the HP 61 series ink cartridges which I haven’t yet viewed the price of them, but as with all ink cartridges, I expect that I will be raped with the prices. The packaging also comes with a CD which wasn’t used, nor should a CD be needed. Black Print Speeds is 8.8ppm and I will expect half that for color. There is only paper tray, so there will be no loading of different paper sizes easily. Not only does the standard network printer capabilities are supported, but so is Air Print, Cloud Print, and ePrint. The tray handles up to 100 pages with a 30 sheet output. There doesn’t seem to be any native Linux Support.

I bought this printer because I have found myself needing to print documents. Beforehand, I would copy the .pdf files to a dedicated thumb drive, take a bus to Downtown, walk to the FedEx Office, make my prints, walk to the bus stop, wait 45 minutes, and get on the bus home. If I forgot to print anything, I would then cuss at myself. However, while there were cheaper printers, I wanted one that would support Cloud Print.

Cloud Print is a protocol developed by Google that would allow compliant printers to be able to receive print commands from any authenticated user no matter where just as if it was a network printer. Obviously, as being developed by Google, this authentication is your Google ID, but nonetheless, it is a system. I could in turn for example give my brother authentication rights. Now, when he is using a resource supporting Cloud Print, he could simply just print, and my printer will print the document.

The Good

The printer seems to perform quickly, and at least on the LAN side – reliably. The printer was cheaper when purchased through Walmart than at HP’s Web Site. Also, I was able to pick up the printer on the same day, and while the Walmart Associates weren’t as quick as they should have been, this had nothing to do with the printer.

The printer also seem to have come with a full cartridge which is a welcomed change from when I last bought a printer that had a ¼ cartridge. During the set up process, I received a claim code which is actually the UID of the printer’s ePrint Address. I simply signed up for a HP Connected Account, and enter the UID. At this time my printer was “connected”.

The Bad

While HP did a good job of minimizing waste packaging, they could have done better. Included in the package was a USB cable which was unnecessary. Most people will likely agree as most people with newer printers are probably using them as network printers. It would have made more sense to replace that USB port with an RJ45 port. Next is the CD. Most people are likely to have an Internet connection and could have simply downloaded the latest version of the software for that OS right from the web. Better yet, this printer supports cloud print. One should just have to download Cloud Print Drivers, and use the printer’s screen to get that unique ID, and get connected that way. I simply shouldn’t have to download, install and mess with bulky software to just set up and use the printer.

The Ugly

Within a few hours of starting the printer, it refused to connect with HP’s servers. I had followed HP’s support options, and nothing. After giving up for the night, and conceding that I would have to call HP the next day, everything worked which led me to believe it was a server side problem. If HP has my email address (to register to set up ePrint), they should have told me that Internet capabilities wouldn’t be running due to down server. Would that have been too much to ask?

My Impression

Most of the negative is more of the legacy structured thinking that seems prevalent. I am treating the connectivity issues as the unlikely misfortunes of timing. And hopefully with Cloud Print set up, I won’t need to go through HP Connected restarting if it does happen again. So far, initial impression on the printer is good. Yes, I am sure there are better, but there are definitely worse too.

Dear Google about Google Voice

Dear Google
re: Complete F**k up with Google Voice

I have been a loyal user of Google Voice back when it was Grand Central. And ever since you offered the app on my first smart phone (Blackberry 8320), I have been using the Google Voice App. Now of course, I am an Android user, and my primary phone is a Nexus 5. So, when you decided to merge Google Voice into Hangouts, I was reluctantly pleased. It would seem as if that reluctance was warranted.

Let’s get this straight. If there is a cellular connection on my phone, I still need Google Voice app to show my Google Voice number. If I move my SMS and hopefully MMS messages to Hangouts, I can’t send SMS messages from the PC without having to have the Hangouts Extension installed on my PC which of course means my PC rings when a call comes in (as if my phone isn’t good enough). Now, to be able to make a call within Hangouts, you need the Hangouts Dialer. So Google, why do you wish to do more work than need be. Here is why I am saying that. Continue reading Dear Google about Google Voice

Nexus 7-32GB with LTE (2013 Edition)

About a month ago, I purchased the Nexus 7-32GB from T-Mobile. Obviously, this is the LTE version, and it is the 2013 Edition which means it is the thinner one with a camera in the front and the rear. I bought this tablet for a couple of reasons. First, I think I should have something relatively nice once every couple of years without a “need” or condition. My last major purchase was my notebook which replace the one that died, and the one before that was my Nexus 4 which required a 2 year contract. Now with the tablet came a down payment which was pretty much the $10 SIM card, and sales taxes on the price defined by T-Mobile. With expedited Shipping, I paid $50 and will be paying $16/month for 24 months. In addition, there is a $10/month service charge for 200MB, but since I am a T-Mobile customer, there is a $10 credit that will be applied to the bill.

The tablet has a Snap Dragon S4 Pro running at a 1.5Ghz Quad Core CPU. This is a little slower, but more cores than my notebook that I am typing this posting on. It has an Adreno 320 GPU running at 400Mhz which is sufficient for tablet games. There is 2GB of memory, and 32GB of storage with no micro-SD card slot. There is a 3950mAh battery which does about 8-9 hours of active use, and can go a day with casual use. The micro-USB2 port supports for both charging, HID (Human Interface Devices), and Slim Port for media. This port is located on the bottom with the 3.5mm headphone jack on the top. Both power, and volume is located on the right hand side along with the Micro-SIM tray. The screen has full HD with 323ppi, a 1.2MP front camera and 5MP rear camera. There is no LED flash however. It supports Dual Band Wifi-N, Quad Band GSM-2, 850/900/1900/2100 HSPA+ as well as AWS 1700/2100 (used by T-Mobile) for GSM 3G. It supports 700/850/1700/1800/1900/2100 MHz LTE, and Bluetooth 4.0LE. Obviously, it also has GPS, and NFC.

Continue reading Nexus 7-32GB with LTE (2013 Edition)

2014-01-27

Not much happened today. As being a Sunday, things are very quiet. It was still too cold to take the two for a walk which is depressing. It is supposed to have a 3 – 4 hour warm streak (above freezing) before it plummets to well below freezing. I will try to take the two out during this small heat wave window. However, today – I made a phone call with Google in which I purchased a Motorola Moto G (Play Edition) for my niece. I was wondering the delay with the transaction, and it will seem the expedited shipping I paid for means nothing with getting the product out, just with the method of shipping. I also walked to the convenience store to get a couple of pizzas as to offset the food that I have now.

As for plans for tomorrow, I will hope to give the dogs a little walk before it gets too cold again. I will also have to wait for UPS for a media tablet, Kong Toy, Shampoo, USB hub (for multiple charging), and two backpacks for the dogs (when the weather gets better). This will come in two packages, but I will assumed to be delivered at the same time. I will also have a couple of videos to watch, but otherwise – no real plans.

First Impression: Nexus 7–LTE Version

About 20 minutes ago, UPS came with a few items I had managed to get. The one in relation to this blog posting is the Nexus 7 with LTE. The reason of why I acquired this tablet was to have something that will supplement the demands on my phone, and provide a better experience with a larger display. The tablet has LTE, therefore, in the event that I should need LTE data, I have it available. And since this is a Nexus device, it will receive a reliable update path. This in turn will be my primary tablet – leaving the Hisense at home exclusively.

The Nexus 7 is $385 from T-Mobile, and will cost about $16/month for 24 months. For those that can afford it may want to just go to Google Play, and purchase directly for $350. Personally, if I had the $350+tax, I would have purchased that way. With it being T-Mobile, I had to pay the SIM kit ($10), and taxes (7%) upfront. I chose expedited shipping which is the only benefit over Google (their shipping of products takes longer). It is a 7” tablet with a 1920×1080 resolution for a total of 323ppi. It has a Corning Glass to help fight against scratches, a 1.2MP front + 5MP rear camera – however, there is no LED flash. It has dual band Wifi-abgn, but there is no Wifi-AC. It also supports all GSM-2G bands, as well as all GSM-3G bands. For LTE, it supports 700/850/1700/1800/1900/2100 Mhz bands. As with all Nexus devices, these are unlocked so I could theoretically take it to another carrier, and not have to beg T-Mobile to allow me to have the device I paid for. There is also Bluetooth 4.0 support and NFC.

The CPU is a quad core 1.5Ghz Qualcomm S4 Pro CPU. It has 2GB of memory, and 32GB of storage. There is no other option with the cellular edition device in storage. In addition as with all Nexus devices, there is no expandable storage. An Audrino 320 running at 400Mhz is the graphics GPU. Audio includes stereo speakers, and a 3.5mm jack. There is a power and volume on the right side, as well as a Slim Port enabled USB charging port on the bottom. The micro-SIM tray is located towards the bottom on the right hand side. A SIM ejection tool comes with the cellular edition of the Nexus 7.

Continue reading First Impression: Nexus 7–LTE Version

2013-11-06

Not much happened today. I walked the dogs, did a little bit of work on a web site, and updated my Google Plus settings. I also caught up on some podcasts. The update with Google Plus will be for when Google rolls out Caller ID services, and therefore will display my name for calls I will make to other Android 4.4 devices.

Andrea, and a couple of the children came by to see the dogs for about 10 minutes. She also provided a small portion of the month she owed, but will not be able to pay the remainder amount until Friday which is becoming a pain in the ass as this will mean she will be late.

Continue reading 2013-11-06

This is not the Hangout You are Looking For

A month ago, Google has a number of communication services that simply do not talk to each other. There is Google Talk which is much like Yahoo Messenger, or AIM. There is Google Voice which uses Google Talk, but offers a phone number. This can also integrate with an Android phone. There is Google Plus Messenger which is a comparison to Facebook Messenger.

However, just recently (2013-05-21), Google has announce Hangout, and offers it as a replacement to Google Talk. It also offers video, and VOIP services for those using Google Plus. The idea will eventually be to replace all of the services with Hangout. Name aside, this is not a great idea, but they do have some parts in the right direction.

Continue reading This is not the Hangout You are Looking For

What Should Be in the Next Android OS

My life is good as for the regards to my cellular phone. I own the Nexus 4 which means I will always get the most recent version of the Android Operating System. With Android 4.2, I found a number of features that I really like, but I personally will like to see some features integrated with Android that would make the phone OS, a more capable system.

Now, I am sure that Google isn’t going to read this blog and say he is absolutely correct, and we need to do this. However, I am still interested in putting out my thoughts on what I think Android should include. I will be entering the features I will want to see from priority of importance.

Continue reading What Should Be in the Next Android OS